SUPERSTITIOUS MUCH?

Hi everybody. Today is November, Friday the 13th. Yep, it’s THAT day.  If your like a large number of people, you might have some reservations about today simply because it’s Friday the 13th.

Friday the 13th is considered by some to be nothing but a crazy superstition. Like a black cat,

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A broken mirror,

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Walking under a ladder,

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Or even spilled salt.

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See or to any of these things and you may be cursed to have bad luck for a VERY long time. If you believe it that sort of thing…

But belive or not, do any of you know WHY Friday the 13th is considered the “unluckiest-day” there is? If not, keep reading to discover the history behind this “bad luck” day. You might be surprised to learn how this day got it’s in ominous meaning. Enjoy!

THE HISTORY OF FRIDAY THE 13TH:

Being wary of Friday the 13th is much more than a quaint superstition observed by a few uneducated people in distant, unreachable towns and hamlets. In the United States alone, it is estimated that between 17 and 21 million people dread that date to the extent that it can be officially classified as a phobia. This phobia is known as: friggatriskaidekaphobia 

So why is Friday the 13th considered such an “evil” day?

The origins aren’t perfectly clear, but we do know that both Friday and, separately, the number 13 have long been considered unlucky and it was around the late 19th century that the first documented instances started popping up of people putting the two together to form the unluckiest day.

The superstition surrounding this day may have arisen in the Middle Ages originating from the story of Jesus’ last supper and crucifixion in which there were 13 individuals present in  the upper room on the 13th Nisan Maundy Thursday, the night before his death on Good Friday.

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Regardless of how it got started,  the “bad luck” of Friday the 13th is dreaded into present day.

But is there any real evidence of this being a bad day? Well, actually, yes….

1. Black Friday Fire:
On Jan. 13, 1939, a bushfire tore through Australia’s Victoria province, killing 36 people in one day. This “Black Friday” fire was the deadly icing on top of a terrible fire season for the province. According to Australian Emergency Management, a total of 71 people died that January, and 75 percent of the state was affected by the flames.

2.  Buckingham Palace Bombed:
One of the most destructive of these hits occurred on a Friday the 13th. On Sept. 13, 1940, Queen Elizabeth and King George VI were at tea, according to the Archives. Five bombs struck the palace, one of which destroyed the interior of the Royal Chapel. Another ruptured a water main. Three people were injured, one fatally.

3. Kansas Floods:
July 13, 1951, was an extremely inauspicious day for northeastern Kansas. Topeka was swamped, as was Lawrence. In the Manhattan, Kansas, business district, the water stood at 8 feet (2.4 m) deep. It was the single worst day offlood destruction in the Midwest to that date, according to the NWS. Twenty-eight people died, and another 500,000 were displaced until the waters receded. The NWS and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers estimate the damage amounted to $935 million at the time, which is equivalent to $6.4 billion in today’s dollars.

4.  A Cold War Crisis:
On Friday, June 13, 1952, the Cold War turned hot when the Soviet Union shot down a Swedish military transport plane. Eight people were on board the plane, which the Swedish government
insisted was merely on a training flight. For its part, the Soviet Union declared it had no involvement in shooting down the lost DC-3.

5.  A Murder Goes Ignored:
One of New York’s most brutal and notorious murders occurred on Friday the 13th. On March 13, 1964, bar manager Kitty Genovese was stabbed and raped by a stranger, Winston Moseley. The attack took more than a half-hour, and an early New York Times articlereported that 38 people witnessed the attack and failed to call the police. The tragic case became a staple in psychology classes as a way to illustrate the “bystander effect,” or “Kitty Genovese syndrome,” which occurs when people fail to act in a situation because they assume someone else would step in.

6. A Deadly Cyclone Strikes:
The deadliest tropical cyclone in history struck on Friday, Nov. 13, 1970, in Bangladesh. Making landfall that Thursday night, the Bhola cyclone killed at least 300,000 people, according to the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research.

7. An Infamous Story of Survival Begins:
team boarded a turboprop plane to travel to a match in Chile. They never made it. Because of a navigational error, the plane careened into an Andean mountain peak, crashing on a high-altitude snowfield.

But the ordeal was only the beginning for 27 of the original 45 passengers who survived the crash and its immediate aftermath. Without cold-weather gear or much food, they were forced to improvise water-melting devices and eventually eat from the bodies of their lost companions — an ordeal memorialized in the 1974 book and 1993 movie “ALIVE.” An avalanche killed eight more survivors at the end of October, and illness took the lives of others.

8. A Lesser-known Plane Crash Kills 174:
Oct. 13, 1972, was not a great day to fly. The same day the turboprop plane carrying the rugby team went down in the Andes, a much larger flight crashed near Moscow’s Sheremetyevo Airport in Russia, according to the ASN. The Ilyushin-62 airplane was carrying 164 passengers and 10 crewmembers from Paris to Moscow, with a stop in Leningrad. As the plane approached the airport, it flew into the ground at an air speed of 385 mph (620 km/h). Everyone on board was killed.

9. Tupac Shakur Dies:

Friday, Sept. 13, 1996, was a tragic day for hip-hop, when rapper Tupac Shakur died of gunshot injuries in a Las Vegas hospital. Shakur had been injured on Sept. 7 in a still-unsolved drive-by shooting and died from those injuries on Friday the 13th.

10. A Cruise Ship Capsizes:
On Jan. 13, 2012, a peaceful Friday of cruising off the Tuscan coast turned chaotic as the Costa Concordia cruise ship struck a reef off the Isola del Giglio and began to tilt. At first, passengers were evacuated by lifeboat but as the ship came to rest on its side in the shallow water, survivors had to be airlifted to shore by helicopter. Thirty-two people died in the wreck.

See, crazy stuff!!

But not only bad things happen on the “evil day”:

1. The HOLLYWOOD Sign Was Born:

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2. Actor Steve Buscemi, director Alfred Hitchcock, and actresses Mary Kate and Ashley Olson were all born on Friday the 13ths:

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3. 2004 Summer Olympics returned to the birthplace of the ancient and modern Olympics:

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4. A New Rock Band Add Their Sound To Rock and Roll:

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See, not all bad right? Not convinced? Either way, here’s hoping your Friday the 13th goes by without any bad luck…Thanks for stopping by.

 

 

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This Week’s Read…Julie Doherty 

Hi everyone. This week I  hosting Julie Doherty and her amazing book, Scent of the Soul. If you want a mix of tough men, beautiful women, danger, and romance, look no further than right here. Enjoy! 


 

BLURB: 

In twelfth century Scotland, it took a half-Gael with a Viking name to restore the clans to their rightful lands. Once an exile, Somerled the Mighty now dominates the west. He’s making alliances, expanding his territory, and proposing marriage to the Manx princess.

 It’s a bad time to fall for Breagha, a torc-wearing slave with a supernatural sense of smell.
Somerled resists the intense attraction to a woman who offers no political gain, and he won’t have a mistress making demands on him while he’s negotiating a marriage his people need. Besides, Breagha belongs to a rival king, one whose fresh alliance Somerled can’t afford to lose.

It’s when Breagha vanishes that Somerled realizes just how much he needs her. He abandons his marriage plans to search for her, unprepared for the evil lurking in the shadowy recesses of Ireland—a lustful demon who will stop at nothing to keep Breagha for himself.

Q & A TIME:

1. What made you want to become a writer?                                           Quite simply, I love telling stories. I wish I didn’t. I’d have a lot more spare time.

2. How do you come up with the names for your characters?             If I’m writing something historical, I look through period documents for names. For example, when choosing names in my 18th century tale, SCATTERED SEEDS, I scanned the indenture registries. No shortage of names there! If I’m working on a contemporary story, I try to choose a name that fits the character’s personality. In my current work-in-progress, one character is on her third name, and I’m still not happy with it. We’ll see how that pans out.

3. Do you have a certain spot that you love to write in?                  Okay, don’t laugh, but I love writing in my car, which I fondly call “The Time Machine.” It’s truly the only place I can go for distraction-free writing. Unless you count the time I parked behind the grocery store and two employees used their break to create their own romance. I guess they didn’t see me.

4. When not writing, what do you like to do in your spare time?           I have a day job thirty-five miles from home, so I don’t have much spare time. Even my vacations involve some type of research for a story I’m working on. My last “vacation” was a two-day trip to Erie, Pennsylvania, where I sailed on the brig, Niagara to get footage for SCATTERED SEEDS’s book trailer.
5. What is the best advice you have ever gotten?                               “Never give up.” My dad gave me that one, and he was right. If you want something badly enough, you have to go after it.


6. If your book was made into a movie, who would you love to see plays the main characters? Heath Ledger would have been so perfect for the part of Somerled, and I’m still heartbroken over his death. He had that glorious wide forehead and the eyes that I describe in SCENT as:
                                                    “deeply set—sailing eyes, the kind made for scanning horizons and seeking out the world’s edge. She saw intelligence in them, and experience beyond his years. She saw, too, infinite responsibility and conflict. His eyes were like doors, locked doors, to a chamber never visited.” 

 
For Breagha, the actress Elena Satine comes to mind.

 “Her eyes were frightened and searching. They were green—vivid green—like Islay’s fields in mid-summer. Above them, her hair gleamed like a polished hazelnut.” 

 
If Steve Buscemi shaved his head, he would make a great Semjaza.

 “Gone also were his hazel eyes, replaced by glowing slits of yellow fury. . . . a head, a hairless one, as cold and bumpy as an oyster shell.”  
AUTHOR BIO:

Julie is a member of Romance Writers of America and Central PA Romance Writers. When not writing, she enjoys antiquing, shooting longbow, traveling, and cooking over an open fire at her cabin. She lives in Pennsylvania with her Irish husband, who sounds a lot like her characters.

Want to contact Julie? Click a link below:
AMAZON: http://www.amazon.com/Scent-Soul-Julie-Doherty-ebook/dp/B00SZ0SKUE
BOOK TRAILER: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dBuB3WC3FGU

GOODREADS: http://www.goodreads.com/author/show/532434.Julie_Doherty

TWITTER: http://twitter.com/SquareSails

FACEBOOK: http://www.facebook.com/

 
BLURB:                                                In twelfth century Scotland, it took a half-Gael with a Viking name to restore the clans to their rightful lands. Once an exile, Somerled the Mighty now dominates the west. He’s making alliances, expanding his territory, and proposing marriage to the Manx princess.

 It’s a bad time to fall for Breagha, a torc-wearing slave with a supernatural sense of smell.

 Somerled resists the intense attraction to a woman who offers no political gain, and he won’t have a mistress making demands on him while he’s negotiating a marriage his people need. Besides, Breagha belongs to a rival king, one whose fresh alliance Somerled can’t afford to lose.

 It’s when Breagha vanishes that Somerled realizes just how much he needs her. He abandons his marriage plans to search for her, unprepared for the evil lurking in the shadowy recesses of Ireland—a lustful demon who will stop at nothing to keep Breagha for himself.